Latest Alerts

Tasmanian grass grub damage

In areas where Tasmanian grass grub can be a problem, damage may be seen. Check pastures particularly around stock camps and assess numbers to determine if insecticidal control is warranted. Bear in mind feeding is slowing and with spring growth approaching control may only be warranted if it is required to preserve pasture plants.

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Porina damage

Porina damage especially in Hawkes Bay, Taranaki, Wairarapa and Manawatu from caterpillars arising from late February/March flights may only now be becoming apparent. Careful consideration needs to be given to control options as spring growth may occur before damage becomes such that plants are lost from pastures.

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Grass grub and porina damage evident

Grass grub and porina damage will now be evident in most areas. Grass grub damage is indicated initially by loss of clover and subsequently by patches of pasture turning yellow. At this time of year these patches become soft under foot and are prone to pugging. Porina damage will show as bare areas of pasture often with only weed plant species present. Conventional insecticide is the only control option likely to give control of either pest. By now production losses have already occurred but treatment may save the affected pastures.

Winter spraying of weeds

Make preparations for winter spraying of weeds if required. Scout paddocks and map infestations of weeds such as ragwort and thistles. Develop strategies for ongoing management of weedy areas, e.g. grazing, set-aside, spraying, nutrient or lime applications etc.

Grass grub and porina

Grass grub and porina damage will now be evident in most areas. By now production losses have already occurred but treatment may save the affected pastures. Conventional insecticide is the only control option likely to give control of grass grub in all areas and of porina in the South Island. North Island porina are still susceptible to diflubenzuron until mid-July. Careful consideration needs to be given to control options as spring growth may occur before damage becomes such that plants are lost from pastures.05

Broadleaved weeds

Check new pastures and apply herbicide as necessary to control broadleaved weeds (6-8 weeks after establishment).

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Tasmanian grass grub damage

Tasmanian grass grub damage may be showing. Check pastures to determine if control is warranted.

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Black beetle larvae damage in North

In the northern North Island damage from black beetle larvae may be showing. Unfortunately little can be done to prevent this. Give thought to sowing resistant plants for future pastures. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide 

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Controlling broadleaved weeds

Check new pastures and apply herbicide as necessary to control broadleaved weeds (6-8 weeks after establishment).

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Grass grub and porina damage may be showing

Grass grub or porina damage may be showing. Grass grub damage is indicated initially by loss of clover, patches of pasture turning yellow and becoming soft under foot. Porina damage appears as small (approx 5 cm dia.) areas of bare ground. Both pests should be controlled as early as possible to maximise returns and protect long term pasture production and quality. Heavy rolling, high stocking rates or N application may provide some relief from grass grub but insecticide (diazinon) may be the only recourse. It is too late to control porina using diflubenzuron in most southern areas, conventional insecticide is still effective. Caterpillars from late February/March flights in the North Island and the South Island West Coast are still susceptible to diflubenzuron.

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Velvetleaf in fodder beet

If velvetleaf seeded in your fodder beet last year, it might be seen this year as a patch 2-3m in diameter. Continue surveillance for this weed and report anything suspicious to MPI on 0800 80 99 66.

For more information go to https://www.mpi.govt.nz/protection-and-response/responding/alerts/velvetleaf/

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Tasmanian grass grub

In areas where Tasmanian grass grub can be a problem damage may be seen. Check pastures particularly around stock camps and assess numbers to determine if insecticidal control is warranted.

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Watch for clover flea damage

In Northland, South Auckland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty watch for clover flea damage to clover and treat early if required to maximise effectiveness. See NZNovachem Agrichemical Manual

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Black beetle larvae damage

In the northern North Island damage from black beetle larvae may be showing. Unfortunately little can be done to prevent this. Adults are deterred by some endophyte- infected grasses which will reduce egg laying and larval numbers. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide 

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If grass grub or porina are of concern…

In areas where grass grub or porina are a concern inspect pastures now for early damage. Grass grub damage is indicated initially by loss of clover and subsequently by patches of pasture turning yellow and later becoming soft under foot. Porina damage initially appears as small (approx 5 cm dia.) areas of bare ground. Both pests should be controlled as early as possible to maximise returns and protect long term pasture production and quality. Although heavy rolling, high stocking rates and application of nitrogen can lessen damage, conventional insecticide (diazinon) may be the only recourse. It is now generally too late to obtain good control of porina using diflubenzuron, although in much of the North Island caterpillars from February/March flights are still susceptible. In most cases porina control now needs to be by conventional insecticide.

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Importing hay

If importing hay from other farms / regions be aware of unwanted weeds – many weed seeds can survive in and be spread via hay. Record the areas where hay has been fed out and regularly check these areas for new weeds after autumn and late spring rains- get rid of unwanted weeds before they become established. If you don’t recognise a weed get it identified.

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Plantain moth

Plantain moth numbers are building up and may increase dramatically after rain if warm conditions continue. Check with agchem reps. for insecticide options.

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Dry weather

Due to dry weather the pastures are very open. There may be a flush of weeds after the first rain- treat if severe. Pennyroyal can also become dominant after a drought and would need to be treated with 2,4-D early in spring if a problem.

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Tasmanian grass grub

In areas where Tasmanian grass grub can be a problem damage may be seen. Check pastures particularly around stock camps and assess numbers to determine if insecticidal control is warranted. Large numbers have been observed in southern Waikato.

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Watch for clover flea damage

Northern North Island watch for clover flea damage to clover and treat early if required to maximise effectiveness.

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Grass grub

In grass grub prone areas 2 and 3 year old pastures should be inspected to determine if potentially damaging levels are present. Early treatment will offer most protection and maximise returns from the cost of intervention.

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Late flights of Porina occurring

Late flights of porina may occur in the North Island, especially in Hawkes Bay, Taranaki, Wairarapa and Manawatu. These could result in damage appearing in June in infested paddocks. Look to apply diflubenzuron in late April-mid May.

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Ordering grass seed?

When ordering grass seed select suitable endophytes and check that the endophyte you select has been assessed in the grass variety you order. In ryegrass AR1,AR37 and diploids with NEA2 will protect against Argentine stem weevil, AR37, Endo5 and NEA2 against black beetle and AR37 against porina. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide for a guide to endophyte selection or the cultivar selector on www.dairynzfvi.co.nzEndophyte levels in the seed should be at least 70% and have been assessed in the last 3 months.

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Mowing Californian thistle

Mowing Californian thistle during rainfall can improve control of this weed by 30% as compared to mowing during dry weather. Best time to do this “wet mowing” is in February/March when the fungi thought to be responsible for this effect are producing spores on the thistle. The effect is likely to be greatest if some members of the thistle population to be mowed are showing signs of disease (wilting, yellowing, dieback).

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Pasture establishment – direct drilling

If pasture establishment by direct drilling is going to be used check those pastures for slugs and grass grub as even low numbers can devastate young seedlings of pasture or crop plants. Wet sacks can be laid in the paddock, slugs will shelter under these and be seen on the pasture surface if inspected after 2-3 days – more than 2 slugs per sack could result in seedling loss. To detect grass grub dig at least 10 15 x15 cm holes 15 cm deep and search the soil – as few as 1 grub/hole could cause damage.

 

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Watch for clover flea damage

In Northland, South Auckland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty watch for clover flea damage to clover and treat early if required to maximise effectiveness.

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Grass grub prone areas

In grass grub prone areas 2 and 3 year old pastures should be inspected to determine if potentially damaging levels are present. Early treatment will offer most protection and maximise returns from the cost of intervention.

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Clover root weevil an issue?

If clover root weevil is an issue in your area, pasture renewal should incorporate a non-clover break crop. This weevil cannot survive in the absence of clover so a clover free break crop provides a temporary weevil free environment that will allow clover seedlings to establish before the weevil reinvades. This will also reduce plant nematodes, plant pathogens and weeds and benefit the new pasture.

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Clover root weevil obvious in most areas

Clover root weevil will be very obvious in most areas. While chemical control is generally not an option careful management of clover will help maintain pasture quality. Additional nitrogen may need to be applied to pastures and clover should not be overgrazed

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Watch for Tasmanian grass grub beetle flights

Watch for Tasmanian grass grub beetle flights. Beetles are attracted to lights at night. Large numbers of beetles flying may indicate potential damage from the larvae in autumn and winter.

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Californian thistle management

Mowing Californian thistle during rainfall can improve control of this weed by 30% as compared to mowing during dry weather. Best time to do this “wet mowing” is in February/March when the fungi thought to be responsible for this effect are producing spores on the thistle. The effect is likely to be greatest if some members of the thistle population to be mowed are showing signs of disease (wilting, yellowing, dieback).

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Velvetleaf – be on the look out

Due to cooler nights and generally colder conditions than normal in many areas, velvetleaf has been slow to emerge. Therefore, surveillance in fodder beet crops for this nasty weed should be extended from now through to March.

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Ordering grass seed

When ordering grass seed select suitable endophytes and check that the endophyte you select has been assessed in the grass variety you order. In ryegrass, AR1 and AR37, and and diploids with NEA2, will protect against Argentine stem weevil, AR37, Endo5 and NEA2 against black beetle and AR37 against porina. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide for a guide to endophyte selection.

Endophyte levels in the seed should be at least 70% and have been assessed in the last 3 months.

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Second porina flight due

The early flight of porina moths has passed but the second flight significant flight is about to occur in the South Island and could take place anytime between now and the end of February. Further flights may occur in March in the North Island. In areas that experienced an early (October/November) porina flight mid January to mid February is the optimal time to be applying diflubenzuron.

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Black beetle larvae damage may be showing

In the northern North Island damage from black beetle larvae may be showing. Unfortunately little can be done to prevent this. Adults are deterred by AR37, Endo5 and NEA2 endophyte- infected grasses which will reduce egg laying and larval numbers. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide 

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Argentine stem weevil is a significant threat to seedling grasses

Argentine stem weevil is a significant threat to seedling grasses, even those infected with endophyte, at this time of year. This also applies to cereal and maize crops. If it is possible, delay sowing until early March when much of this threat will have passed. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide for endophyte selection

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Last year velvetleaf was found in many fodder beet crops

Last year velvetleaf seed was introduced to NZ as a contaminant of fodder beet seed and planted in many properties throughout NZ. To date more than 250 properties have been found to be infested with this terrible weed. Six different lines of fodder beet seed have been identified as contaminated but there could be others that were not picked up. Similarly there may be paddocks where velvetleaf was present but not found. Therefore, if you have either grown fodder beet or received fodder beet onto your property you need to be vigilant and keep an eye out for this weed and do not let it establish on your property. Velvet leaf is declared Unwanted Organism by MPI and occurrences must be reported and dealt with. For more information phone the MPI hotline 0800 80 99 66 or go to MPI or go to AgPest, or contact your regional council.

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Clover root weevil present in most areas

Clover root weevil will be very obvious in most areas. While control is generally not an option careful management of clover will help maintain pasture quality. Additional nitrogen may need to be applied to pastures and clover should not be overgrazed.

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Argentine stem weevils will increase in significance over summer

Argentine stem weevils increase in significance over summer. Be aware that seedling grasses, even those infected with endophyte, are very susceptible to damage from this pest if numbers are high. This also applies to cereal and maize crops. Coated seed or pre-emergence insecticide application can prevent damage.

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The early flight of porina moths has passed

The early flight of porina moths has passed but the second significant flight is about to occur in the South Island and could take place anytime between now and the end of February. Further flights may occur in March in the North Island. In areas that experienced an early (October/November) porina flight, mid-January to mid-February is the optimal time to be applying diflubenzuron.

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Note Tasmanian grass grub beetle flights

Watch for Tasmanian grass grub beetle flights, large numbers of beetles flying may indicate potential damage from the larvae in autumn and winter.

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In the northern North Island damage from black beetle larvae may be showing

In the northern North Island damage from black beetle larvae may be showing. Unfortunately little can be done to prevent this. Adults are deterred by some endophyte- infected grasses which will reduce egg laying and larval numbers. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide

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Velvetleaf

Last year velvetleaf seed was introduced to NZ as a contaminant of fodder beet seed and planted in many properties throughout NZ.

To date more than 250 properties have been found to be infested with this terrible weed. Six different lines of fodder beet seed have been identified as contaminated, but there could be others that have not been picked up. Similarly there may be paddocks where velvetleaf was present but not found. Therefore, if you have either grown fodder beet or received fodder beet onto your property you need to be vigilant and keep an eye out for this weed and do not let it establish on your property.

Velvetleaf is declared an Unwanted Organism by MPI and occurrences must be reported and dealt with.

For further information phone the MPI hotline 0800 80 99 66 or go to MPI website, or go to AgPest, or contact your regional council.

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Porina flights

Look for and note porina flights as these can indicate when to adopt control measures later if required.

For further information on porina, including identification, impacts and control methods please click here.

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Apply herbicides to yellow bristle grass before seed heads ripen

Apply herbicides to yellow bristle grass before seed heads ripen.

Avoid moving stock from infested to clean paddocks – seeds can survive in dung. Don’t make hay from paddocks heavily infested with yellow bristle grass or other summer growing grass weeds –  the seeds can survive in hay. In contrast, yellow bristle grass seeds are highly unlikely to survive in well made silage and wrapped baleage.

For further information on yellow bristle grass, including identification, impacts on your pasture and control methods please click here.

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Clover root weevil present in most areas

Clover root weevil will be very obvious in most areas.

While control is generally not an option, careful management of clover will help maintain pasture quality. Additional nitrogen may need to be applied to pastures and clover should not be over grazed.

For further information on clover root weevil, including identification, impact on your pastures and control methods click on the links below:

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Check sunny slopes for Chilean needle grass

Chilean needle grass will become evident in pastures in November-December. Keep an eye out for the reddish purple colour of the seed heads when they first emerge.

Each seed has a 7cm long awn (bristle-like tail). This grass is most likely to be found in pastures on north/west-facing drought-prone slopes but may be present in contaminated stock feed / hay.

If you suspect that you have it, please contact your local council biosecurity people for identification and management advice immediately.

Click here to learn more about Chilean needle grass.

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Plantain moths & caterpillars beginning to build up

Plantain moths and caterpillars are beginning to build up. Monitor stands closely, particularly pure and plantain/clover stands, for the presence of moths or caterpillars.

Treat early to prevent large infestations and to minimise damage.

For further information on this pest, including identification, impact on your pastures and control methods click on the link below:

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Aphids, diamondback moth & white butterfly caterpillars in brassica crops

Keep an eye on aphids, diamondback moth caterpillars and white butterfly caterpillars in brassica crops. With warm summer temperatures, and following the mild winter in the South, these can increase quickly. Treating these pests before high numbers occur will provide greatest economic return.

For further information, including identification, impact and control on any of these pests please click on the links below:

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Chilean needle grass evident

Chilean needle grass will become evident in pastures during November and December as its distinctive purple-coloured spikelets, with their developing long-awned needle-sharp seeds, emerge from elongating flower stems. Details of this invasive grass can be found on AgPest. This grass is most likely to be found in pastures on north/west-facing drought-prone slopes.  If you suspect that you have it, please contact your local council biosecurity people for identification and management advice.

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Look out for velvetleaf

Last year velvetleaf seed was introduced to NZ as a contaminant of fodder beet seed and planted in many properties throughout NZ. To date more than 250 properties have been found to be infested with this terrible weed. Six different lines of fodder beet seed have been identified as contaminated but there could be others that were not picked up. Similarly there may be paddocks where velvetleaf was present but not found.

Therefore, if you have either grown fodder beet or received fodder beet onto your property you need to be vigilant and keep an eye out for this weed and do not let it establish on your property. Velvet leaf is declared Unwanted Organism by MPI and occurrences must be reported and dealt with.

For more information phone the MPI hotline 0800 80 99 66 or go to MPI or go to AgPest, or contact your regional council.

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Look out for porina flights

Look for and note porina flights as these can indicate when to adopt control measures later if required.

For further information on Porina including biology, impact and control, follow the link below:

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Chilean needle grass will soon become evident in pastures

Chilean needle grass will become evident in pastures in November-December. Keep an eye out for the reddish purple colour of the seed heads when they first emerge. Each seed has a 7 cm long awn (bristle-like tail). This grass is most likely to be found in pastures on north/west-facing drought-prone slopes but may be present in contaminated stock feed / hay.

If you suspect that you have it, please contact your local council biosecurity people for identification and management advice immediately.

For further information on Chilean needle grass including biology, impact and control, follow the link below:

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Argentine stem weevil numbers increasing

Argentine stem weevil is building up in the North Island and will need to be considered in pasture and crop establishment.

Insecticide coated seed may be a viable control option and insecticide application can provide temporary relief from this pest and allow seedlings to establish. Argentine stem weevil is a significant threat to seedling grasses, even those infected with endophyte, cereals and maize crops. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide for a guide to endophyte selection.

For further information on Argentine stem weevil including biology, impact and control, follow the links below:

 

 

 

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Clover root weevil present in most areas

Clover root weevil will be very obvious in most areas –U shaped notches at the edge of clover leaves show adults are present. The presence of larvae may be indicated by the pasture appearing nitrogen deficient. While control is generally not an option careful management of clover will help maintain pasture quality. Additional nitrogen may need to be applied to pastures and clover should not be over grazed.

For further information on clover root weevil including biology, impact and control, follow the links below:

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Look for porina flights

At the end of the month look for porina flights – indicated by large numbers being attracted to lights at night, as these can indicate when to adopt control measures at a later date if required.

For further information on porina including identification, biology, control and management click here.

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Look out for velvetleaf

Last year velvetleaf seed was introduced to New Zealand as a contaminant of fodder beet seed and planted in many properties throughout New Zealand..

To date more than 250 properties have been found to be infested with this terrible weed. Six different lines of fodder beet seed have been identified as contaminated, but there could be others that were not picked up. Similarly there may be paddocks where velvetleaf was present but not found. Therefore, if you have either grown fodder beet or received fodder beet onto your property you need to be vigilant and keep an eye out for this weed and do not let it establish on your property.

Velvetleaf is declared Unwanted Organism by MPI and occurrences must be reported and dealt with.

For more information phone the MPI hotline 0800 80 99 66 or go to  MPI website , or go to AgPest, or contact your regional council.

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Look for brassica springtails

Look for brassica springtails before sowing brassica crops. Place a white card or cloth on the soil surface and gently disturb the soil around it. This will cause the springtails to jump and land on it making them easier to see.

For further information on brassica springtail, including identification, biology, impact and control click here.

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Pasture renewal required after grass grub/porina damage?

For pastures badly affected by either grass grub or porina over winter and needing renewal, consider direct drilling. This will preserve naturally occurring diseases of these pests that are building up in the soil and which will provide long term population regulation. Leave sowing as late as possible as both pests, especially in the south, may still be feeding and could devastate establishing seedlings. Be aware that slugs and clover root weevil may also be present in damaging numbers.

For further information on either of these pests, including identification, biology, impact and control, click on the links below:

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Sow treated seed in black beetle prone areas

Use treated seed in black beetle prone areas to reduce adult numbers.

For further information on black beetle including identification, biology, impact and control click here.

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Direct drilling? Look for slugs

If direct drilling new pastures or crops check for slugs as these can devastate establishing seedlings. An application of slug pellets may be required or control may be achieved by heavy stocking rates.

For further information on field slug identification, biology, impact and management click here.

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Ordering grass seed? Select endophyte

When ordering grass seed select suitable endophytes and check that the endophyte you select has been assessed in the grass variety you order. In ryegrass, AR1 and AR37, and diploids with NEA2, will protect against Argentine stem weevil, AR37, Endo5 and NEA2 against black beetle and AR37 against Porina.

See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide for a guide to endophyte selection.

Endophyte levels in the seed should be at least 70% and have been assessed in the last 3 months.

For further information on weed and pest identification, biology, impact and management click here.

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Clover root weevils in pasture

In established pastures with high levels of clover root weevil, the clover may be adding little in the way of nitrogen to the pasture and compensatory nitrogen applications may be required.

For further information on clover root weevil, including identification, biology, impact and control click here.

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Observe for clover flea damage

In Northland, South Auckland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty watch for clover flea damage to clover – this appears initially as small holes in leaves, more severe damage results in only leaf veins and the lower leaf surface remaining making the crop appear silver. Treat early if required to maximise effectiveness.

For further information on clover flea, including identification, biology, impact and control click here.

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Invasive weed Field horsetail

Field horsetail (Equisetum arvense) is a very difficult to control perennial weed that regrows each spring/summer from an extensive underground root system. Preventing establishment is the best form of control. Make sure your contractors machines are clean and ask where the machines have been. This root system comprises actively growing rhizomes that can penetrate to more than 1 m in depth, from which green fern-like fronds grow each year. Attached to the deeper rhizomes are small tubers which remain dormant while the rhizome stays alive. Upon the death/decay of the rhizome, or when it becomes detached due to cultivation or other means, the tubers are able to produce new plants.

For further information on Field horsetail including identification, biology, impact and management click here.

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Summer-active grass weeds

If your run-out pasture was infested with summer-active grass weeds last summer, consider growing a forage crop for one or two summers prior to sowing the perennial pasture. This provides the opportunity to selectively spray the summer-active grasses and prevent weed seeds from replenishing the seed bank and infesting newly sown pastures. Forage crops will also disrupt clover root weevil populations, allowing better subsequent establishment of young clover.

For further information on weed and pest identification, biology, impact and management visit our AgPest Online Pest Directory.

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Clover root weevils in pasture may reduce amount of nitrogen fixed by clover

In established pastures with high levels of clover root weevil the clover may be adding little in the way of nitrogen to the pasture and compensatory nitrogen applications may be required.

For further information on clover root weevil including biology, impact and control, follow the links below:

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Clover root weevil an issue?

If clover root weevil is an issue in your area, pasture renewal should incorporate a non-clover break crop.

This weevil cannot survive in the absence of clover, so a clover free break crop provides a temporary weevil free environment that will allow clover seedlings to establish before the weevil reinvades. This will also produce plant nematodes, plant pathogens and weeds, and benefit the new pasture.

For more information on Clover root weevil, including biology, impact and control, click on the link below:

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Ordering grass seed? Select endophyte

When ordering grass seed, select suitable endophytes and check that the endophyte you select has been assessed in the grass variety you order.

In ryegrass, AR1 and AR37, and diploids with NEA2, will protect against Argentine stem weevil, AR37, Endo5 and NEA2 against black beetle and AR37 against porina. See DairyNZ Pasture Renewal Guide for a guide to endophyte selection or the cultivar selector at www.dairynzfvi.co.nz

Endophyte levels in the seed should be at least 70% and have been assessed in the last 3 months.

For further information on identifying and controlling pasture pests, visit our website:

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Watch out for clover flea damage

In Northland, South Auckland, Waikato and the Bay of Plenty, watch for clover flea damage to clover and treat early if required to maximise effectiveness.

For further information on this pest, including biology, impact and control, click on the link below:

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Was your pasture infested with summer-active grass weeds last summer?

If your run-out pasture was infested with summer-active grass weeds (such as yellow bristle grass) last summer, consider growing a forage crop for one or two summers prior to sowing the perennial pasture. This provides the opportunity to selectively spray the summer-active grasses and prevent weed seeds from replenishing the seed bank and infesting newly sown pastures.

For further information on pasture weed pests, including biology, impact and control, please follow the links below:

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Direct drilling new pasture? Look for pests…

If pasture establishment by direct drilling is going to be used, check those pastures for pests; especially slugs and grass grub as even low numbers can devastate young seedlings of pasture or crop plants.

Fur further information on these pasture pests, including biology, impact and control please click on the links below:

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Pasture renewal required after grass grub/porina damage?

For pastures badly affected by either grass grub or porina over winter and needing renewal consider direct drilling. This will preserve naturally occurring diseases of these pests that are building up in the soil and which will provide long term population regulation. Leave sowing as late as possible as both pests, especially in the South, may still be feeding and could devastate establishing seedlings. Be aware that slugs and clover root weevil may also be present in damaging numbers. Use of treated seed is recommended.

For further information on these pasture pests, including biology, control and management please follow the links below:

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Water Pepper added to the AgPest Pest Directory.

Water Pepper has been added to the AgPest online Pest Directory.

It is a Very common weed found in damp pastures and near waterways throughout lower areas of both North and South Islands. It is rarely grazed and therefore replaces more useful pasture species in damper areas within pastures.

For further info on Water pepper, including identification, biology, impact & control click here: http://agpest.co.nz/?pesttypes=water-pepper

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Hairy buttercup added to AgPest

Hairy buttercup has been added to the AgPest online Pest Directory.

Hairy buttercup is not considered poisonous to livestock but because dairy cows tend to avoid it and prefer to graze grasses and clovers, it can become dominant in the pasture.

More info, including identification, biology, impact and control here: http://agpest.co.nz/?pesttypes=hairy-buttercup

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New weed pests added to the AgPest directory

Recently we have added 7 new weed pests to the AgPest Directory.

The new profiles on AgPest have information relating to the identification, biology, impact and control for the following weeds:

AgPest contains a number of New Zealand pasture weeds and pests, which have been chosen in consultation with key farming, industry and research personnel. We will continue to identify and add more weeds and pests to the directory.

Click here to view our Pest Directory

Found something new on your farm? Not sure if it’s a pest or not? Click here to use our free online identify tool

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Pest damage showing in pastures

Damage to pastures often becomes very obvious in winter. Generally it is too late to prevent production losses which have already occurred, however pastures may be saved and long term quality maintained if pests are controlled.

If this is necessary, identify the pest and adopt appropriate control measures.

Bear in mind that spring growth is not far away and may outgrow the effect of the pest.

To identify a pest on your farm, and to view control and management options click here.

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Porina & Grass Grub Damage

Porina and Grass Grub damage is showing in areas of the lower North Island.

The only option available to protect pasture now is insecticide.

For further information on these pasture pests follow the links below:

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Broadleaved weed control

Check established pastures for broadleaved weeds and apply herbicide as necessary once clover growth has slowed.

Need to identify a weed or pasture pest on your farm? Head on over to our website www.agpest.co.nz where you can use our free online identify tool and learn more about the impacts, biology and information on how to manage pasture pests and weeds.

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Tasmanian grass grub damage may be showing

Damage may be showing in areas where Tasmanian grass grub can be a problem.

Check pastures particularly around stock camps and assess numbers to determine if insecticidal control is warranted. Bear in mind feeding is slowing and with spring growth approaching, control may only be warranted if it is required to preserve pasture plants.

For further information on Tasmanian grass grub, including biology, impacts and control please follow the link below:

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Porina damage from late moth flights may be apparent

Porina damage especially in Hawkes Bay, Taranaki, Wairarapa, Ruhapehu, Taupo districts and Manawatu, from caterpillars arising from late February/March flights may only now becoming apparent.

Careful consideration needs to be given to control options as spring growth may occur before damage becomes such that the plants are lost from pastures.

For further information on Porina, including biology, impact and control, please follow the link below:

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Grass Grub and Porina damage now evident

Grass grub and porina damage will now be evident in most areas.

Grass grub damage is indicated initially by loss of clover and subsequently by patches of pasture turning yellow. At this time of year these patches become soft under foot and are prone to pugging.

Porina damage will show as bare areas of pasture often with only weed plant species present. Conventional insecticide is the only control option likely to give control of either pest.

By now production losses have already occurred but treatment may save the affected pastures.

For further information on either of these pests please follow the links below:

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